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September 25, 2006

Read Banned Books



“[I]t's not just the books under fire now that worry me. It is the books that will never be written. The books that will never be read. And all due to the fear of censorship. As always, young readers will be the real losers.” — Judy Blume


6 comments:

  1. I love the new "ticket to freedom" campaign. It amazes me that there is still such a thing as a list of challenged books.

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  2. I'm going to read them ALL! I love a challenge. The minute someone tells me not to do something is the minute I want to begin doing it. Just like a five year old would.

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  3. Iliana - It amazes me, too. I'm with Bellezza. I'm almost more apt to read something that's been challenged, just to see what all the fuss is about.

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  4. I was inspired by your's and Bellezza's posts. Thought I'd discuss the idea of challenged books with my 10 youth-in-custody students. When I walked through a lesson scenario I realized that my kids don't read. I know, very sad. I could imagine them telling me they could care less. When I read some of the book titles, they probably wouldn't be familiar with any of them. A thought that I read years ago popped into my mind, "Those who CAN read and don't are no better off than those who CAN'T read." Both stay ignorant and jeopardize their freedom.

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  5. booklogged, you might be interested in a book I read this summer by Mark Saltzman titled "True Notebooks." It's how he taught a writing class in a California center for juvenile delinquents, and made a postive effect in many of their lives. It was just a plain interesting read period.

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  6. Booklogged - That is sad that the kids don't read! My first husband wasn't a reader at all. I should've taken that as a sign!

    Bellezza - Thanks for the book rec. Off to Amazon to read up on it.

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